Albanese declares the coalition is “stuck for time” after Labour’s climate bill passes the House of Commons

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The Prime Minister, Anthony Albanese, has declared the Coalition “stuck in time” after MPs and the Greens joined Labor to pass the government’s signature climate legislation.

The passage of the bill through the House of Commons on Thursday enshrines into law an emissions reduction target of 43% on 2005 levels by 2030 and a net zero emissions commitment by 2050.

It also includes new commitments for the Norwegian Climate Agency, including annual updates to parliament and changes from independents and the Greens that allow for more ambitious targets into the future.

Related: After more than a decade of darkness in Australia’s parliament, today was a good day for the climate | Katharine Murphy

Climate Change Minister Chris Bowen said the bill’s success was a “good day for our country” and thanked the independents and the crossbench for working constructively to amend the bill.

Four Green MPs in the House of Commons, along with independents Monique Ryan, Sophie Scamps, Allegra Spender, Zali Steggall, Kylea Tink, Rebekha Sharkie, Monique Ryan and Andrew Wilkie all voted with the government, allowing it to pass by 89 votes to 55.

Anthony Albanese speaks to the blue-green independents, the Greens and cross-party MPs during the vote and debate on climate change in the House of Representatives on Thursday.

Anthony Albanese speaks to the blue-green independents, the Greens and cross-party MPs during the vote and debate on climate change in the House of Representatives on Thursday. Photo: Mike Bowers/The Guardian

Tasmanian Liberal MP Bridget Archer crossed the floor to also back Labor’s legislation, after telling her coalition colleagues on Tuesday that she did not want to be perceived in the electorate as opposing action on climate change.

While their amendments were among those passed by the government, independents Kate Chaney and Helen Haines were absent with Covid-19.

Albanese said the bill’s passage fulfilled one of Labour’s “core” commitments as he condemned the Coalition for its “extraordinary” opposition when the bill had broad support, including from business.

“Parliament worked effectively to support the mandate that we got at the election, with the exception of the coalition, which continues to be stuck in time while the world heats up around it,” he said.

“This so-called private enterprise is today thumbing its nose at business in Australia that is crying out for security going forward.

“It’s extraordinary that they chose to do that.”

Peter Dutton and other opposition members amid divisions over changes to the climate bill on Thursday.

Peter Dutton and other opposition members amid divisions over changes to the climate bill on Thursday. Photo: Mick Tsikas/AAP

Albanese said he believed it would be unsustainable for the coalition to go to the next election without reconsidering its position.

“It would be very brave for such an alternative political party – seeking to govern, as opposed to a minor party – to say we are going to tear down the structures that have been put in place and which were overwhelmingly supported by business and the mainstream by the conservation movement, but most importantly also by the Australian people,” he said.

Related: John Howard’s climate doubt reveals more about Conservative identity politics than anything else | Temperature check

In question time, Albanese doubled down on his criticism of the coalition, saying that the bill should mark the end of the climate wars.

“Today represents the opportunity for Parliament to stop arguing about whether to reduce emissions and start working together on how to reduce emissions,” he said.

The bill will now be assessed by a Senate inquiry which will report on 31 August. It is then expected to pass legislation in the September sittings of Parliament with the support of the Greens and independent ACT senator David Pocock.

Greens leader Adam Bandt said the Senate inquiry would be an opportunity for a “rigorous examination” of the 114 new coal and gas projects on the books, saying they would undermine Labour’s emissions targets.

“The passage of this bill is a small step towards tackling the climate crisis, but the good work cannot be undone by Labor now opening new coal and gas mines,” Bandt said.

He also flagged that the Greens will take a tougher approach to negotiations on the new safeguard mechanism, which Labor intends to use to ensure the country’s biggest polluters start curbing emissions.

“The Senate must approve the safeguard mechanism,” he said. “It is the government’s opportunity to listen to science, listen to our neighbors in the Pacific, listen to the UN and come up with a rule that will keep coal and gas in the ground and stop new projects from being opened. That’s the critical issue here.”

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